Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, vol. 44, no. 2 (July 2020)

Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries StudiesDutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies
vol. 44, no. 2 (July 2020)

Special Issue: Transnational Trajectories of Dutch Literature

guest-edited by Elke Brems , Theresia Feldmann , Orsolya Réthelyi and Ton van Kalmthout

https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ydtc20/current?nav=tocList

Editorial

The Transnational Trajectories of Dutch Literature as a Minor Literature: A View from World Literature and Translation Studies
Elke Brems , Theresia Feldmann , Orsolya Réthelyi & Ton van Kalmthout

Articles

Obtaining World Fame from the Periphery
Johan Heilbron

Dutch Literature in Translation: A Global View
Jack McMartin

Rückübersetzung: The Fates of Nico Rost’s Diary Goethe in Dachau
Jan Ceuppens

A Cold War Literary Mystery: Agents, Manipulation and Patterns of Ideology in the Translated Oeuvre of Theun de Vries
Orsolya Réthelyi

‘A Good Way to Propagate Communist Thought’: Czech Translations of Dutch Historical Novels during the Communist Regime or Orwell in Practice
Wilken Engelbrecht

Peripheries in the Global System of Translation: A Case Study of Serbian Translations of Dutch Literature between 1991 and 2015
Bojana Budimir

The Untameable Trotzkopf: Commerce and Canonicity in the Curious Circulation of a Classic of German Children’s Literature in the Low Countries and Germany
Theresia Feldmann

Abstracts

The Transnational Trajectories of Dutch Literature as a Minor Literature:
A View from World Literature and Translation Studies
Elke Brems , Theresia Feldmann , Orsolya Réthelyi & Ton van Kalmthout

This introductory paper discusses recent theories concerning the phenomenon of world literature and its connection with translation, the main focus of this special issue. Subsequently, the article relates the contributions to the theories discussed and indicates in which institutional framework the issue was realized.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03096564.2020.1747005 (pp. 125–135)

Obtaining World Fame from the Periphery
Johan Heilbron

Although book translations are overwhelmingly made from English and a small number of other central languages, translations occasionally also flow in the opposite direction, i.e. from peripheral countries and languages to more central ones. This article explores the translation and international recognition of Dutch writers. It identifies a general pattern structured by three successive circuits of selection, diffusion, valorization and recognition. The first is the semi-official Dutch circuit outside of the Netherlands, socially based on Dutch-speaking groups abroad, dependent on Dutch foreign policy, and institutionally tied to embassies, institutes for Dutch culture, and university departments for Dutch language and literature. After having achieved some degree of visibility and recognition in this protected circuit, some writers succeed in obtaining access to a second circuit consisting of the respective national literary fields of the receiving countries. Selection and recognition here depend on editors, publishers, critics, and audiences of the receiving country. The last circuit – the one in which international fame can be obtained – represents an even more selective, transnational universe institutionally tied to world book fairs, international publishing houses, and international prizes. The process by which writers can pass from the first to the second and third circuit is, for most, one of progressive elimination.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1747284 (pp. 136–144)

Dutch Literature in Translation: A Global View
Jack McMartin

This article analyzes a dataset of over 11,000 book translations from Dutch published in the last two decades to give a global picture of recent outgoing translation flows. It examines four main categories – genre, author national grouping (Dutch/Flemish), target language, and translation grant status – revealing children’s literature and fiction to be important export genres; a steady increase in the number of translations of works by Dutch authors and a stagnation in the number of translations of works by Flemish authors; central positions for German, English and French as important target languages, semi-peripheral positions for Spanish, Italian and Danish and an emerging position for Chinese; and a remarkable rise in the number and percentage of translations that received translation grants. The article goes on to explore translation grants in more detail, examining the ‘literary quality’ criterium and the ‘market-correcting’ justification used by the Dutch Foundation for Literature and Flanders Literature (formerly known as the Flemish Literature Fund). It concludes by critically evaluating how these two aspects shape outgoing translation flows and potentially reinforce power imbalances within the Dutch-language field.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1747006 (pp. 145–164)

Rückübersetzung: The Fates of Nico Rost’s Diary Goethe in Dachau
Jan Ceuppens

This paper deals with how ideological factors influence the transfer of literature through translation between what translation sociology calls ‘peripheral languages’. The international dissemination of the literary œuvre of the Dutch communist writer Theun de Vries (1907–2005) in translation stands in the centre of this investigation, which focuses on three questions: 1.) How the transfer of literary products from a peripheral language into both peripheral and central languages takes place, and what specific dynamics can be shown to shape these translation flows. 2.) How ideology plays a role in shaping translation flows. 3.) How methodological tools from translation sociology can and cannot be used to investigate literary export from peripheral literatures. Through the case study of the translation of De Vries’ novel Hoogverraad [High Treason] (1950) into Hungarian the details and dynamics of Cold War cultural transfer and literary manipulation are analysed.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1747009 (pp. 165–180)

A Cold War Literary Mystery: Agents, Manipulation and Patterns of Ideology in the Translated OEuvre of Theun de Vries
Orsolya Réthelyi

The publication of Czech translations of Dutch-written literature during the Communist regime was subject to the norms of Socialist Realism as well as to the censorship of the Committee for Culture and Propaganda of the CC of the Communist Party, executed through the literary agency DILIA. The paper attempts to demonstrate why several works were (not) permitted to be published, focusing on historical novels being the preferred genre of that period. The analysis has been made based on archive records preserved in publishers’ archives in The Hague (Literary Museum) and Prague (Memorial of National Scripture).

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1747010 (pp. 181–200)

‘A Good Way to Propagate Communist Thought’: Czech Translations of Dutch Historical Novels during the Communist Regime or Orwell in Practice
Wilken Engelbrecht

This paper aims to explore translation flows from Dutch into Serbian in the period between 1991 and 2015, and to identify the most important trends in the selection and production of translations in the context of core-periphery theory. In this study, a model proposed by Pięta will be used for data analysis. This model is structured around five key questions: what was translated, when was it translated, how was it translated, who translated it, and why was it translated. The first part of the paper will be focused on presenting and describing the data, followed by a discussion of the findings in the second part, where we will try to explain how various factors intertwine and influence each other.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1747012 (pp. 201–217)

Peripheries in the Global System of Translation: A Case Study of Serbian Translations of Dutch Literature between 1991 and 2015
Bojana Budimir

This paper aims to explore translation flows from Dutch into Serbian in the period between 1991 and 2015, and to identify the most important trends in the selection and production of translations in the context of core-periphery theory. In this study, a model proposed by Pięta will be used for data analysis. This model is structured around five key questions: what was translated, when was it translated, how was it translated, who translated it, and why was it translated. The first part of the paper will be focused on presenting and describing the data, followed by a discussion of the findings in the second part, where we will try to explain how various factors intertwine and influence each other.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1747012 (pp. 218–235)

The Untameable Trotzkopf: Commerce and Canonicity in the Curious Circulation of a Classic of German Children’s Literature in the Low Countries and Germany
Theresia Feldmann

This paper investigates the multidirectional circulation of the Trotzkopf series in the Low Countries and Germany. Emmy von Rhoden’s Der Trotzkopf (1885), a classic of German children’s literature, and its sequels were almost immediately translated into Dutch. However, Stijfkopje als Grootmoeder (1904) the sequel that completes the series, was written by the Dutch writer Suze la Chapelle-Roobol. Translated into German it was treated as an original part of the official series. Through a functional analysis of the text based on criteria formulated by Aleida Assmann in her essay on written folklore, this article tries to uncover the transnational mechanisms of canonization, circulation, and reception behind the series. It reveals that consecration and circulation were largely reception- and commerce-driven and not initiated by critics and literary institutions as is often the case for canonical works of adult fiction, confirming earlier findings in research on the canonization of children’s literature.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2020.1747013 (pp. 236-253)