Low Countries History Seminar, 2020/21 (IHR London, UK)

Seminar on Low Countries History, 2020/21 session

Convenors: Liesbeth Corens (Queen Mary), Anne Goldgar (Univ. Southern California), Ben Kaplan (UCL), Ulrich Tiedau (UCL), Joanna Woodall (Courtauld)

Meetings: Fridays at 5:30 pm.  Autumn-term meetings will be held virtually (online) via Zoom.  Attendance is open and free but registration is required via the IHR website; details about how to join the virtual event will be circulated via email to registered attendees 24 hours in advance.

Meetings in the spring and summer terms will be held, depending on circumstances, either virtually via Zoom or in hybrid form with both virtual and physical attendance possible. Our physical meeting place is Wolfson Room I in the basement of the Institute for Historical Research, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU.

If you are not on the Seminar’s mailing list but would like to be added to it, please email Ben Kaplan at b.kaplan@ucl.ac.uk

To register to attend one of the meetings listed below, please go to
https://www.history.ac.uk/seminars/low-countries-history

Autumn Term

23 October      Michaël Green (Copenhagen), ‘Notions of Privacy in Egodocuments from Early Modern Amsterdam’

6 November    Wim Klooster (Clark University, Worcester, Mass.), ‘The Petition to Keep New Netherland: Amsterdam’s Merchants and the Fear of English Ascendancy’

20 November  Margaret Schotte (York University, Ontario), ‘Dutch Atlases and Nautical Manuals – Opening the Treasure Chests’

4 December     Hal Parker (St Louis), ‘Global Calvinism: Conversion and Commerce in the Dutch Empire, 1600–1800’

Spring Term

5 February       Brianne Dolce (IHR), ‘A Disputed Inheritance on the Franco-Belgian Border: Writing the Cultural History of Medieval Arras, 1792–1900’

19 February     Michael Depreter (Oxford), ‘The Counts of Flanders, the Towns, and England. Patterns of Diplomatic Competition and Complementarity in Times of Revolt (14th–16th centuries)’

5 March           Susanne Friedrich (Munich), `Economies of Knowledge. The Epistemic Cultures in the Dutch East India Company (1602–c. 1650)’

19 March         Ad Putter (Bristol), ‘The Dutch Hat Makers of Medieval                              London’

Summer Term

21 May                        Freya Sierhuis (York), ‘Staging Muslim-Jewish Encounters in the Amsterdamse Schouwburg’

4 June              Karwan Fatah-Black (Leiden), ‘The Changing Understanding of Colonial Slavery in Dutch National History and Identity’

Fikry El Azzouzi will be 2020 Writer in Residence @UCLDutch

Fikry El Azzouzi, UCLDutch Writer in Residence 2020The Dutch Department’s annual Writer in Residence 2020 will be Flemish author and journalist Fikry El Azzouzi.

Dutch department finalists will be translating a section of his latest novel De Beloning (‘The reward’), in collaboration with their counterparts at the Universities of Sheffield and Nottingham.

Fikry El Azzouzi (b. 1978), a Flemish-Moroccan author, writes novels, columns and plays. He debuted in 2010 with ‘The Feast of the Sheep’. For his novel Drarrie in the Night and his play ‘Jihad Travels’, he was awarded the 65th Arkprijs van het Vrije Woord. She Alone is the love story of a Flemish woman and a Moroccan man, and at the same time a dystopian warning about Europe and its growing fear of everything that is different. The Reward is a satirical coming-of-age story.

LetterenfondsFlanders Literature

2019 Anglo-Netherlands postgraduate essay prize awarded to Lucelle Pardoe

ANS Essay Prize 2019
Christine Sas. Lucelle Pardoe, Jeremy Bentham (all UCL) and Paul Dimond (ANS).

Recent UCL Dutch Translation Masters graduate Lucelle Pardoe has been awarded the 2019 Essay Prize of the Anglo-Netherlands Society (ANS). Her essay, titled ‘Doodgewoon: Translating Age-Appropriate Material in Dutch Children’s Literature’, dealt with translating a children’s book about coping with death into a different culture. Paul Dimond, ANS Council member and former British Ambassador presented Lucelle with her certificate, the prize cheque and a complimentary membership of the Anglo-Netherlands Society yesterday (21 November 2019). As is apparent from the picture, Jeremy Bentham regarded the ceremony with favour.

Founded in 1920, only one year after UCL Dutch, the Anglo-Netherlands Society has worked to develop goodwill and understanding between the peoples of the United Kingdom and the Netherlands for almost a century. The Society has as its purpose the promotion of the social, artistic, literary, educational, scientific and other interests that the Dutch and the British have in common. It is a non-party-political, non-profit making organisation with a national remit, based in London, and run by voluntary effort.

Centenary of Dutch Studies at UCL (and the Anglophone world at large)

alcs2019Between 6 and 9 November close to 80 international scholars from both sides of the Atlantic met in the UCL Institute for Advanced Studies for the 13th international conference of the Association for Low Countries Studies “Worlding the Low Countries”, marking the 100th anniversary of UCL Dutch. In 1919 the very first Chair for Dutch Studies in the Anglophone world was instituted here, with the later famous historian Pieter Geyl as first incumbent.

Dagomar Degroot delivering his keynoteWith keynotes on the “Dutch Republic and the Future of Conflict in a Warming Climate” by Dagomar Degroot (Georgetown), “Rethinking Dutch Literary Modernity (1880–1920) by Saskia Pieterse (Utrecht), “Diasporic Objects and Persons, Restitution and the Gift” by Bambi Ceuppens (Royal Museum for Central Africa, Brussels) and “Translation and the Multiple Languages of the Early Modern Low Countries” by SELCS‘s very own Theo Hermans, and 15 packed panels, the conference focussed on the worldliness of the Low Countries by broadening this type of research to the study of Dutch, including, of course, its global varieties and relations.

Bambi Ceuppens delivering her keynoteThe scholarly programme was rounded off by a screening of Marjoleine Boonstra’s The Miracle of Le Petit Prince, followed by a Q&A with the director in the Dutch Centre, and culminated in an alumni reunion and festive celebration of UCL Dutch’s centenary on Saturday 9th, for which more than 100 alumni of the department had signed up. Axel Rüger, the newly appointed chief executive of the Royal Academy of Arts and former director of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and Curator of the Low Countries collections at the National Gallery, entertained the audience with a visually engaging talk on his experiences of working in the art world and brokering relations between the UK and the Low Countries.

ALCS2019

Alumni and Friends of UCL Dutch are encouraged to join our LinkedIn group (bit.ly/31q6hsx) to stay in touch with the department. Information about the UCLDutch Centenary programme and upcoming events can also be found at dutch100.com and on Twitter @ucldutch.

Hans Bennis, Taaluni director, opening the diner pensantA Diner Pensant on the eve of the conference, kindly hosted in the Royal Academy of Arts, brought together representatives of UCL, our Dutch colleagues from Sheffield, the University Council of Modern Languages, the diplomatic missions and other stakeholders to discuss the institutional environment of Dutch Studies on a UK-wide level. We are grateful for the generous support by our partners and sponsors the Nederlandse Taalunie (Dutch Language Union), Flanders House, the UCL Institute for Advanced Studies, SELCS, the Anglo-Netherlands Society, the Dutch Centre, The Low Countries and Tony’s Chocolonely slavery-free chocolate.

More information can be found on the conference website.

(Re)Watch Dagomar Degroot’s opening keynote from “Worlding the Low Countries” conference, 6 November 2019

Lessons from the Golden Age: The Dutch Republic and the Future of Conflict in a Warming Climate

As temperatures soar in the coming century, essential resources may grow scarce in temperate latitudes but more abundant in the Arctic. Geographers, political scientists, and journalists have concluded that wars will grow more common as the distribution and quantity of resources shift to favour some nations over others. Yet the history of the Dutch Republic in the seventeenth century reveals that these relation­ships are much more complicated than common­ly assumed. Climatic shocks in that century, caused largely by volcanic eruptions, did indeed incite violence across the Dutch trading empire, but only by exacerbating existing sources of discontent.

Dagomar DegrootClimate change could also mitigate conflict, however, including in the Arctic where environ­ments were especially sensitive to changes in temperature. By changing environments that served as battlefields, climatic trends also influenced how the long wars of the seventeenth century actually unfolded, a relationship rarely considered in projections of the hotter future. Perhaps above all, wars fought by the Dutch and other polities across the early modern world made many communities and societies more vulnerable to the worst effects of climate change.

The experiences of the Dutch in the seventeenth century cannot tell us exactly what we can expect in the very different world to come, but they can help us imagine the future in different, more complex ways.

BBC3 Radio on modern Dutch literature (9 Oct. 2019, 10pm)

BBC3

Laurence Scott looks at the way Dutch writers are addressing history and contemporary life with Rodaan Al Galidi, Eva Meijer, Onno Blom, Herman Koch and Toon Tellegen.

Eva Meijer is an author, artist, singer, songwriter and philosopher. Her non-fiction study on animal Communication, Animal Languages has been published this year and her first novel to be translated into English Bird Cottage, has been nominated for the BNG and Libris prizes in the Netherlands and is being translated into several languages.

Rodaan Al Galidi is a trained engineer who fled his native Iraq and arrived in the Netherlands in 1998. He taught himself Dutch and now writes both prose and poetry. His novel De autist en de postduif (The autist and the carrier-pigeon) was one of the books in 2011 given the EU Prize for Literature.

Onno Blom is an author, literary reviewer and freelance journalist who has appears regularly discussing books on the Dutch radio show TROS Nieuws, has worked as editor-in-chief at the publishing house Prometheus and whose biography of the Dutch artist and sculptor Jan Hendrik Wolkers won the 2018 Dutch biography prize.

Herman Koch is an actor and a writer. His best selling novelist, The Dinner, was published in 55 countries and sold more than a million copies. His new book, The Ditch, is a literary thriller.

Toon Tellegen is is one of the best-known Dutch writers. In 2007 he received two major prizes for his entire oeuvre. He considers himself in the first place a poet and has published more than twenty collections of poetry to date, among them Raptors. He is also a novelist and a prolific and popular children’s author.

Events put on by the Dutch Foundation for Literature, New Dutch Writing and Modern Culture take Dutch writers to Norwich, London.

Producer: Zahid Warley

Release date: 09 October 2019
44 minutes

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00094ck

 

Dutch Walk through Bloomsbury and King’s Cross

Many thanks to everybody who came along to the Dutch events on the UCL It’s All Academic Festival – a fun, free, interactive festival for all ages and interests. Almost 40 people signed up for the Dutch Language Taster (Yes, You Can Speak Dutch!) and our  Dutch Walk through Bloomsbury  & King’s Cross, next to many other exciting events from across UCL.
Christine reading "The Evenings" in front of Gerard Reve's home 1952-57
Christine reading “The Evenings” in front of Gerard Reve’s home 1952-57
Gerard Reve
Gerard Reve, Fotocollectie Anefo Nationaal Archief, Den Haag 2.24.01.05, no. 921-9989
Anne Frank
Anne Frank bust by Doreen Kern in the British Library

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aletta Jacobs
Aletta Jacobs meets Elizabeth Garrett Anderson
VOC
VOC pub in King’s Cross (now closed)