CfP: Worlding the Low Countries

1 February 2019

UCL

Worlding the Low Countries: 13th international conference of the ALCS

6–8 November 2019, University College London

Call for Papers

As the truism goes, we are all connected, yet research on the worldliness of the Low Countries is still a rather minor fraction of Dutch Studies. The ALCS2019 conference attempts to broaden and encourage this type of research and wishes to world the study of Dutch, including, of course, its global varieties and relations. It invites speakers to focus on the interconnection between the Low Countries and the world, and on the different scales (local, regional, national, continental, global) and levels (aesthetic, cultural, linguistic, political, economic, ecological etc.) on which these exchanges take place. Marking the occasion of the Centenary of Neerlandistiek in the Anglophone world (the first Chair for Dutch Studies was founded here in 1919), the 13th international and interdisciplinary Conference of the Association for Low Countries Studies (ALCS2019) will be held at UCL on Wednesday to Friday, 6–8 November 2019. We are looking for individual papers (20 minutes) and fully constituted panel suggestions (3 * 20 minutes plus Chair) on this year’s conference theme of ‘Worlding the Low Countries’ from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary angles. Questions that could be considered include the following (but paper proposals are not restricted to these suggestions):

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Symposium on Geyl in Britain, 1914–1935 (17 Nov. 2016)

Fifty years ago, on 31 December 1966, Pieter Geyl passed away. He was arguably one of the most internationally known historians from the Netherlands, and one of the most controversial at that. Having come to the UK as a journalist in the first place, he started his academic career at UCL in the aftermath of World War I, with the first endowed Chair for Dutch Studies in the Anglophone world (1919). Known for his re-interpretation of the 16th century Dutch Revolt against the Habsburgs as well as for his political activism in favour of the Flemish movement in Belgium, and for his provocative debates with British historians like Arnold Toynbee, he left his stamp on the British perception of Low Countries history and culture, before leaving London in 1935 to accept a Chair in Utrecht.

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