Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, vol. 43, no. 3 (November 2019)

Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries StudiesDutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies
vol. 43, no. 3 (November 2019)

Select papers from the XIXth Biennial Interdisciplinary Conference on Netherlandic Studies (Bloomington, Ind., June 2018)
Guest-edited by Marsely L. Kehoe (Hope College, Holland, Mich.) and Jesse Sadler (Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, Cal.)

https://tandfonline.com/toc/ydtc20/43/3?nav=tocList

Contents

Editorial

Select papers from the XIXth Biennial Interdisciplinary Conference on Netherlandic Studies
Marsely L. Kehoe & Jesse Sadler

Articles

Political Sites and Collective Identities in Hendrick Avercamp’s Ice-Skating Landscapes
Isabella Lores-Chavez

Birds of a Feather: Deciphering the Didactic Iconography and Humour of Adriaen van de Venne’s Hoe dienen wij bij een!
Sarah Dyer Magleby

New Netherlands, Archival Deficiency, and Contesting New York History in the Antebellum U.S.
Derek Kane O’Leary

From Bastions to Models: Deutsche Schulen in Den Niederlanden as Tools of German Cultural Policy
Joshua Sander

Abstracts

Political Sites and Collective Identities in Hendrick Avercamp’s Ice-Skating Landscapes
Isabella Lores-Chavez

In the first decades of the seventeenth century, Hendrick Avercamp was among the first Dutch painters to prioritize local landscape subjects as a source of pictorial interest. Avercamp’s ice-skating scenes offer a vision of a prosperous society emerging in the Northern provinces in the midst of the Dutch Revolt against Spain. This paper argues that Avercamp’s work, rather than simply celebrating a quaint pastime, invites a more political reading. Avercamp’s use of nascent symbols of Dutch identity – particularly the tricolour flag – tie his paintings inextricably to the political cause of Dutch autonomy, and suggest the political consciousness of the citizens of the young Republic.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2019.1656798

Birds of a Feather: Deciphering the Didactic Iconography and Humour of Adriaen van de Venne’s Hoe dienen wij bij een!
Sarah Dyer Magleby

Delft-born Adriaen van de Venne (1580–1662) is an artist well-known for his genre scenes, portraits, and book illustrations. He also created images with great moralistic and comic value, such as his painting Hoe dienen wij bij een!, made between c. 1614 and 1662. This painting portrays two brown and black-spotted owls in the guise of humans skating on a frozen lake. As other more conventional birds soar above the distant skeletal trees, these feathered creatures both wear contemporary clothing. The male owl also clenches a rope in his beak with a pair of glasses knotted at the end. This same rope attaches behind him to the female owl’s chest, but instead of spectacles, her end holds several dead mice. Above the two anthropomorphic animals floats a banderole, which translates to ‘How well we go together!’ Although scholars believe van de Venne intended this work as lighthearted with only a vague message of foolishness, I contend that through the artist’s use of iconographic imagery and well-known proverbs and themes, van de Venne produced a humorous painting with a moralizing and didactic message which condemned the vice of adultery and warned the male audience about the dangers of a cunning woman.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2019.1656851

New Netherlands, Archival Deficiency, and Contesting New York History in the Antebellum U.S.
Derek Kane O’Leary

In nineteenth-century New York, the collection, translation, and republication of documents related to colonial Dutch history was about more than antiquarianism or the ethno-centrism of Dutch-descended Americans. With the unprecedented support of the state of New York and U.S. ministers in Europe, the New York Historical Society (NYHS) orchestrated a much more ambitious project to reinscribe Dutch imperialism within a grander narrative of the state. This, they hoped, would situate New York at the centre of national history, and its archive as the nation’s most important historical record. In doing so, the stewards of the state’s archives and history worked to displace the burlesque rendition of New York’s past popularized by Washington Irving, in favor of a unified, progressive, celebratory narrative.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2019.1656852

From Bastions to Models: Deutsche Schulen in Den Niederlanden as Tools of German Cultural Policy
Joshua Sander

Successive German governments in the twentieth century used the system of German International Schools to achieve their cultural policy goals in the Netherlands. Prior to the Nazi assumption of power, the Weimar government and local German community leaders in the Netherlands saw the schools as bastions of German culture and as tools to prevent the ‘Dutchification’ of Germans living abroad. With Hitler’s accession to the Chancellorship, the purpose of these schools changed to include the inculcation of a National Socialist and Germanic worldview among the students. Finally, with the German occupation during the Second World War, these schools, which the Nazi occupiers significantly expanded, were seen as models for the future development of Dutch education. Although the ultimate Nazi defeat limited the effect of these German International Schools upon the larger Dutch educational establishment, the changes the German Schools underwent in the 1930s were largely mirrored by Dutch institutions during the occupation. The German International Schools therefore stand as further evidence of the Nazis’ larger designs for the Netherlands after the hoped-for German victory.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2019.1656854

Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, vol. 42, no. 3 (November 2018)

Volume 42, Number 3, November 2018

Dutch Crossing : Journal of Low Countries Studies

https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ydtc20/42/3?nav=tocList

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Editorial
Ulrich Tiedau

Stylometric Authorship Attribution for the Middle Dutch Mystical Tradition from Groenendaal
Mike Kestemont

The Re-education of Conversos in 17th Century Amsterdam
Tzvi Aryeh Benoff

‘Don’t Whine’: Sexuality, Adultery and Emancipation in Annie M. G. Schmidt and Harry Bannink’s Musical Heerlijk Duurt het Langst (1965)
Sanne Thierens Continue reading “Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, vol. 42, no. 3 (November 2018)”